Book Review: A Bag of Moonshine

A Bag Of Moonshine by Alan Garner
A Bag Of Moonshine
by Alan Garner

4 out of 5 stars on GoodReads


I loved this collection of fairy tales, rewritten from the folklore of England and Wales. The author has an uncanny ability to mimic the story-telling style of old folk tales, with whimsy and ingenuity.

The black and white illustrations add to the ghoulish atmosphere of the tales, and they are true to the art style I see in so many old fairy tale books from the late 1800s.

The enchantment of these stories lies in the excellent word-craft, and the weird and eccentric characters who populate the world of magic and mayhem. Full of changlings, witches, ogres who spin gold, and the clever youngest brother named Jack, these stories captivate the reader with the magnetic words and witty narrative style.

Fairy Tale Retelling Book Tag

 

What’s your favorite fairy tale? Leave me a comment!

Brunette Bibliophile’s Original Video: https://youtu.be/2oIAGwq7MQ0

QUESTIONS:

1.What is your favorite fairy tale?

2.What is your favorite retelling of that story? Continue reading

Book Review: The Gold Dust Letters

The Gold Dust Letters
The Gold Dust Letters by Janet Taylor Lisle

My rating: 1 of 5 stars

Angela writes a letter to her fairy godmother, and is surprised when a fairy answers her letters. Angela and her friends become obsessed with reaching out to the fairy, determined to meet her and prove that fairy magic is real.

But this isn’t really a story about three girls discovering a fairy; it’s actually a story about a girl whose parents might get a divorce, and how she feels estranged from her father, and turns to her friends for comfort and advice.

This book was just sort of okay. The writing is nothing special. The characters are one-dimensional. The plot is boring.

The only interesting thing in the entire book is the girl who talks Continue reading

Book Review: The Revenge of the Shadow King

The Revenge of the Shadow King
The Revenge of the Shadow King by Derek Benz
My rating: 2 of 5 stars

Max Sumner and his three best friends, Harley, Ernie, and Natalia–who form the secret club The Grey Griffins–seem to be the only people in their very normal Minnesota town to notice that strange things have started to happen. When creatures like goblins and fairies and unicorns, all characters from a card game the Grey Griffins play, begin to make appearances in Max’s backyard, Max and his friends know something is terribly wrong. And it’s up to them to stop the wicked creatures of the cards from destroying their town-indeed, their world. – GoodReads

I liked this book pretty well, but it wasn’t amazing or anything. Most of the characters, plot, and writing were very trite and redundant. But there were a few really good scenes that kept me interested enough to finish reading the book.

The writing keeps stating the obvious over and over again, and has a problem with “telling” instead of “showing”. The writing is mostly good and interesting, but I never really got lost in the story. I never forgot that I was reading a book. Continue reading